‘Non-advertising’ hiring up due to feds’ new appointments policy, data shows

My latest – links below:

The new appointments policy allowing for greater flexibility in the hiring of federal public servants came into effect in April 2016, resulting in a greater number of “non-advertised” hiring compared to formal publicly advertised hiring processes and competitions.

The Public Service Commission has reported on an overall increase in non-advertised appointments to 34 per cent of hires in 2017-18 compared to 25 per cent in the previous fiscal year, reflecting the attractiveness of this easier way to staff. 2018-19 data shows a further increase to 35 per cent. Greater use of non-advertised staffing raises the potential risk of the “who you know” factor playing a greater role in hiring and this analysis aims to assess this potential risk.

Source: ‘Non-advertising’ hiring up due to feds’ new appointments policy, data shows (Hill Times)

pdf: TBS New Appointments Policy Impact, New Appointments Policy: Annex A Departmental Comparisons (clearer table than in the HT piece)

About Andrew
Andrew blogs and tweets public policy issues, particularly the relationship between the political and bureaucratic levels, citizenship and multiculturalism. His latest book, Policy Arrogance or Innocent Bias, recounts his experience as a senior public servant in this area.

2 Responses to ‘Non-advertising’ hiring up due to feds’ new appointments policy, data shows

  1. UMIT KIZILTAN says:

    really glad they picked it up right away. curious if there will be any reactions, follow up etc. thanks

    Umit

    On Wed, Jun 3, 2020 at 7:20 AM Multicultural Meanderings wrote:

    > Andrew posted: ” My latest – links below: The new appointments policy > allowing for greater flexibility in the hiring of federal public servants > came into effect in April 2016, resulting in a greater number of > “non-advertised” hiring compared to formal publicl” >

  2. Andrew says:

    Starting to get some. Most interesting one to date was highlighting that advertised processes were often written in a way to result in favoured candidates and that the flexibility to use non-advertised was a means to do so more transparently while using advertised in a truly open sense to encourage outside applicants and renew the public service.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: