Immigration feels toddler better off ‘culturally, linguistically’ in India than with parents in Canada | Ottawa Citizen

While always risky to pass judgment based upon media accounts, the immigration officer’s comments, while no doubt well-meaning,  seem particularly obtuse and patronising given the longer-term implications of his continuing to be separated from his parents:

The department’s silence on the case is baffling, especially in light of a report by the Immigration visa officer in Delhi who rejected the parents’ application to be reunited with their son on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

The visa officer says in the report obtained by the Citizen that Daksh is better off in India, where he lives with his grandparents and is in an environment “culturally and linguistically familiar to him.”

The report also says Daksh has always lived with his grandparents, never with his parents, which they deny.

“Based on information submitted, it would appear that the child has never resided with his father or mother. It seems the child has continuously resided with his grandparents. … It seems to me that (Sood and Bajaj) have already made a determination that the best interest of the child would be for him not to go to Canada.

“To uproot the child at this time and move him to an unfamiliar environment, in a different climate, culture and language would be very upsetting and not in his best interest. In addition, he would be living with unfamiliar people, as his lifelong caregivers would not be with him.”

Immigration feels toddler better off ‘culturally, linguistically’ in India than with parents in Canada | Ottawa Citizen.